Growth in Developed Economies Slowed in Third Quarter, OECD Says

Economic growth in developed countries slowed in the three months to September, but remains on course for a pickup in 2017 overall. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said Monday the combined economic output of its 35 members was 0.6% higher in the third quarter than in the three months through June. This was a slowdown from the 0.8% growth recorded in the second quarter…

Global stocks still on track for second weekly fall

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The U.S. dollar was lower on Friday along with Wall Street stocks as investors pulled back from technology stocks and were skeptical President Donald Trump’s Republican party would succeed in its efforts at U.S. tax reform. U.S. Treasury yields edged lower, in line with declines in U.S. stock indexes and German 10-year bond yields, as risk appetites faded. The yield curve continued to flatten after strong U.S. housing starts data for October…

‘We will not be cowed by the North Koreans’: Australian minister

North Korea has issued its latest threat against Australia for its relationship with the US and South Korea, but a Turnbull government minister said the nation would “not be cowed” by the rogue state. North Korean state media reported Australia was “showing dangerous moves of zealously joining the frenzied political and military provocations of the US against DPRK”, warning against it…

Will world growth continue – or are we heading for a slowdown? | Nouriel Roubini

Following IMF’s World Economic Outlook, here are three scenarios for global economy in medium term

For the past few years, the global economy has been oscillating between periods of acceleration (when growth is positive and strengthening) and periods of deceleration (when growth is positive but weakening). After more than a year of acceleration, is the world heading towards another slowdown, or will the recovery persist?

The current upswing in growth and equity markets has been going strong since the summer of 2016. Despite a brief hiccup after the Brexit vote, the acceleration endured not only Donald Trump’s election as US president but the heightening policy uncertainty and geopolitical chaos that he has generated. In response to this apparent resilience, the International Monetary Fund, which in recent years had characterised global growth as the “new mediocre”, upgraded its World Economic Outlook in July.

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World stocks reach new peak as Fed-focused week begins

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A world stock index was up slightly on Monday and the dollar rose to a more-than seven-week peak against the yen as investors awaited clues from the U.S. Federal Reserve on the timing of further rate hikes and tensions over North Korea eased. The S&P 500 was nearly flat, cutting early gains following a decline in tech shares…

Australia, Japan, U.S. urge to ensure South China Sea code of conduct is ‘legally binding’

MANILA (Reuters) – Australia, Japan and the United States on Monday urged Southeast Asia and China to ensure that a South China Sea code of conduct they have committed to draw up will be legally binding and said they strongly opposed “coercive unilateral actions”. The Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) and China should establish a set of rules that were “legally binding, meaningful, effective, and consistent with international law”, the foreign ministers of the three countries said in a statement following a meeting in Manila…

China growth data boosts copper prices; global stocks hit record high

LONDON (Reuters) – Strong data from China kept world shares near a record high on Monday, sent copper to a 4-1/2 month peak while emerging market stocks have achieved a near a five percent gain over the last five days. Figures from Beijing showed China’s economy grew at a faster-than-forecast 6.9 percent year-on-year in the second quarter thanks to a pick-up in industrial output and domestic consumption and as investment remained strong…

Global stocks decline as oil prices slump; dollar hits 7-month low

World stock markets lost ground on Tuesday, pressured by a sharp drop in oil prices to their lowest in more than a year, while the U.S. dollar strengthened on hawkish comments from U.S. Federal Reserve officials. Brent crude touched its lowest level since April 2016 and WTI hit its lowest since February 2016 following news of increases in supply by several key producers. [O/R]..

Wall Street climbs, Dow hits all-time high, bank shares rise ahead of Fed decision

World stock markets recovered after a technology-led selloff and short-dated U.S. bond yields hit multi-week peaks on Tuesday as investor focus turned to the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy meeting. Technology shares edged higher after a two-session drop that put the spotlight on areas of the stock market where valuations appear stretched.
The U.S. central bank is widely expected to raise its benchmark interest rate on Wednesday and may also provide details on its plans to shrink $4.5 trillion of assets it amassed to nurse the economic recovery…

U.N. slaps North Korea with new sanctions agreed by U.S. and China

The U.N. Security Council on Friday expanded targeted sanctions against North Korea after its repeated missile tests, adopting the first such resolution agreed by the United States and Pyongyang’s only major ally China since President Donald Trump took office. The Trump administration has been pressing China aggressively to rein in its reclusive neighbor, warning that all options are on the table if Pyongyang persists with its nuclear and missile development programs…

World Bank echoes its 2017 global growth forecast at 2.7%, citing pickup in manufacturing, trade

The World Bank on Sunday maintained its forecast that global growth will improve to 2.7 percent this year, citing a pickup in manufacturing and trade, improved market confidence and a recovery in commodity prices. The update of the multilateral development lender’s Global Economic Prospects report marked the first time in several years that its June forecasts were not reduced from those published in January due to rising growth risks…

Canada, Mexico and Japan want to revive the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade deal

President Trump left a mammoth Pacific free trade deal in ruins. Now, the other countries involved want to rebuild it. Ministers from 11 nations — including Australia, Canada, Mexico and Japan — agreed over the weekend to try to revive the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which was designed to reshape trade across the Pacific Rim. But economists caution that whatever emerges from the process will be a shadow of the deal Trump killed…

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